No Man’s Sky: Two Weeks Later

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So it’s been a while. Blaugaust was going so well and then bam, I haven’t written in like a week.

I’m the kind of friend who gets super excited about a game, gets all of my friends to buy it and then plays it for a week and never picks it up again. I’m a bad friend…To remedy this, I’ve been playing games and waiting to see if my personal hype wears off too fast before I ask my friends to join me. It’s been working well so far and I actually have better reasons to ask friends to play other than “OMG IT”S SO GOOOOOOD!”

I’ve been loving no man’s sky for the past 2 weeks. It has it’s flaws, OK it has a lot of flaws, but the game still captures my interest. Though, 2 weeks in the enchantment is wearing off little by little. I’m not even very far into it yet. I’ve jumped to a total of three galaxy’s and have just been following the story way points around.

I thought No Man’s Sky would be this game where I would get lost in it for hours exploring alien planets and naming creatures. It was like that for the first two days but lately I’ve been playing it an hour here or there after work. It’s an incredibly slow way to play a game but I’m in no hurry. I actually find myself losing interest if I play it for more than an hour, for all it’s procedural generation, everything has started to feel the same. The animal combinations are still awesome though. It’s like a bunch of kids played the biggest game of Cootie ever.

I also thought naming things would never get boring. After the first planet where I realized just how many rocks and plants could be named I decided I’d only be naming planets, systems, and animals. Along the way I’ve named some interesting looking plants and rocks as well though. It’s still fun to scan things though just to put my marker on them, No Man’s Sky really puts me in the mind set of I found it first and you can’t have it.

Flight is a little disappointing. The auto pilot takes over if you get too low to the ground so you’re perpetually 20 feet in the air. Also all the ships feel the same when you fly them, apart from the number of inventory spaces and the cockpit screen there isn’t a difference in the ships.

The thing I find the most fun right now is collecting the bits of alien language. It’s satisfying when you slowly start to understand what npc’s are saying. It’s a mechanic that I really didn’t expect to be all that fun.

Overall, I’m still enjoying the game a little bit at a time. I’m looking forward to see what is implemented in the future if anything. No Man’s Sky in it’s current state is exactly what I thought it would be so updates are only icing on the cake. I may never get to the center of the galaxy but I’m sure there will be a lot of adventures and sight seeing along the way.

NMS: The Journey Begins

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There was a blinding light as my life support came back online. As my eyes adjusted, the world around me slowly faded into focus. It was lush, green, with towering trees and endless rolling planes. In a galaxy of nearly infinite possibilities, this was not the worst place to find myself stranded. I looked at my surroundings trying to remember how I got here. Behind me a ship sat smoking. Was it mine? It had to be mine. My life exosuit gently reminded me I needed to fix the ship and I needed to leave the planet. Thank god my exosuit has all the information I need to complete the repairs, I’m no ship mechanic.

The first thing I need is Iron which is in abundance here. My mining laser cuts through the rocks with ease extracting the elements I need. With every use the power slowly decreases, the batteries dying I don’t know how to recharge it. I collect my iron and make the part needed to fix the launch thrusters. My multi-tool is out of power but the exosuit tells me it can be charged with an isotope like carbon. The only sources of carbon around were tiny plants, I  broke them up manually by hitting them with my useless multi-tool. Over the course of 15 minutes I managed to scrape up enough carbon to charge the mining beam to 50%. I needed to find a better source of carbon, maybe the strange looking trees in the distance. I started walk.

When I reached the grove I chopped at the tree until I had extracted all of it’s carbon. It was enough to fully charge the beam and i had some still left. I quickly harvested the remaining trees so that I would have extra when I needed it. I harvested some more iron, some zinc, I even found some plutonium. All of this was enough to completely repair my other multi-tool features, a scanner to illuminate points of interest and a bio scanner to identify and discover creatures. It wasn’t long after repairing when I encountered the first life form on this alien world.

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The Scuttle Bug is quick, it’s vicious, and is easily provoked. They appear to be solitary creatures and will attack on sight. I ran into these far more than I would have liked. Each time barely escaping as I tried to scare them off with my mining beam.

My exosuit informed me that I needed another ore to repair the pulse engine. I walked nearly a half hour across the plains and plateaus to find the giant hunk of ore reaching toward the sky. On the return trek back to the ship, the scanner picked up a point of inteest not too far off the beaten path. The need to repair my ship warred with my curiosity of this place. I trudged on across the plains toward the tiny question mark.

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When I arrived I found an abandoned outpost, I could find no signs of life. I raided the containers for materials, a scrap of cloth, some plutonium, and a health station. As I traveled inside the outpost the whir of a functioning trade terminal caught my attention. I offloaded some of the carbon I had as it had grown to excess but I was reluctant to sell anything else for fear that I might need it in the future.  I left the outpost walking quickly to my ship.

Following the instructions I repaired the last malfunctioning pieces of the ship. Luckily all the thermite9 I’d been collecting along the way was used to fuel the thrusters. I was going to leave this planet. I had no inking of where I would go next, but I would listen to the exosuit, it had not lead me astray yet. as I climbed into the cockpit, I hear a rumbling, something was approaching fast and low. I looked up and saw another ship, I was not alone.

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I engaged the launch sequence and took flight hoping to follow the alien ship. It was too quick, and I lost it over a mountain. The exosuit gently reminded me to leave the planet. I pulled the ship up, and left the atmosphere. With the pulse drive functioning, I could explore the vast expanses of space. I didn’t know where to go, where home was, who I was but I knew I had to push forward.

The exosuit picked up a beacon on a distant planet. I was instructed to go there and investigate. Pulse drive engages, I set a course for Kokhayskoy Oske, hoping to find something that would jog my memory.

 

Relearning All the Things

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Last night I had the chance to start playing Final Fantasy 14 again. When I logged in things were not quite how I remembered them. My classes were a little lower than I originally thought with my Bard sitting at 47 and my White Mage sitting at 44. I also had a lot more inventory space than I thought. I went ahead with my plan to clean it up still and now I have a whole bag and a half left.

I was feeling like I’d forgotten a lot of the controls and the skills so I took the time to reorient myself with what every thing did. Slowly but surely I got my footing back as I waited for Jay to do his Main Story Quest. I was planning on helping him get through the story dungeons he needed until he caught up t me. I also ran my White Mage class quests which I apparently hadn’t done in a while because I had 3 to do. After finishing them all up I’m now the proud owner of Holy.

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I had forgotten exactly where Jay was in the story, when he said he had hit a dungeon I thought it was going TO be Brayflox’s Longstop. Instead when i hit commence on the queue I found my self in Haukke Manor, oh how I hate Haukke Manor. I don’t know what it is about this dungeon but I’ve never liked running it. It’s not that its hard, it seems to take longer than some of the other dungeons and the bosses aren’t all that interesting. Since it was the first dungeon I ran in a while I was bit rusty. Jay, our tank, died a few times as I was trying to figure out the right balance between Cleric Stance DPSing and healing the tank. Thank goodness for Swift Cast + Res. Surprisingly, neither of the DPS’s we were with left and after our 30 minute struggle we emerged from the dungeon victorious and Jay had some new gear for his Gladiator.

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It was getting late so we decided to run the roulette and end the night. Being a tank and healer combo the queue popped immediately. As the loading screen faded we found ourselves in Haukke Manor once again. We both groaned, but this time we were prepared and the other two people in our party were super nice. They gave us some tips and good conversation. We made it out of our second run a lot quicker than our first and no one died, a rousing success.

After all was said and done, we ended the night with Jay starting his Paladin class quest and my White Mage leveling up to 46. I can’t wait to play again tonight.

 

The Class Dilemma

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It’s always exciting to start a new game no matter what it is. I’ve always enjoyed the first few hours of learning the basics, getting a foundation in the game, and being prepared for bigger and better things. There are 2 things in MMOs that have me sitting in the first few hours over and over again. One is character customization and the other is choosing a class.

I love games with a lot of classes to choose from. I like finding the ones I like by playing the first couple of levels. Unfortunately this means I play the same quests and missions over and over again until I finally find the class that suits me. Once I find the class I might make one more character to perfect how it looks and then continue on in the game.

Over the past 2 weeks I’ve been through 4 characters in Neverwinter. I started with a Great Weapon FIghter, but I didn’t like some of his abilities, especially his charged AoE swing attack. Then I moved on to a Control Wizard, it felt like he was going to be hard to play solo with and I again didn’t like his kit early on. I’ve been reading that classes really come into their own at 70 but I wasn’t enjoying these 2 at all in the extremely early game.

My main right now, and by main I mean character past level 8, is a Tiefling Scourge Warlock. I played it when I tried the game on PC and I loved it then. On the PS4 the starting skills feel powerful enough that I can do things on my own. Also, it has a skill that summons a Soul Puppet, and I really like the name Soul Puppet. I also started a  Dwarf Devoted Cleric with Jay last night, he’ll  be fun to play in a co-op setting.

The problem with Neverwinter is that it only allows you to have 2 character slots at any given time. So those other characters who I ran through the first 8 levels or so are completely gone. It’s somewhat annoying but I understand, free to play games have to make their money somewhere. There are still 4 classes I haven’t tried yet but right now I’m tired of hearing the same quests again and again so I’ll wait a while before I try those.

Despite all the bugs and growing pains, the games not bad on the PS4. The controls are good, everything is mapped to the controller well. It does take a little getting used to targeting with the right analog stick to attack I keep forgetting it’s not tab targeting. The graphics are Ok, it runs pretty well in dungeons but inside cities like  Protector’s Enclave the game starts to chug along. That’s to be expected though. The UI is a little clunky with the controller as well but it’s not a huge inconvenience. I don’t know if it’s a game I’ll play for a long period of time, but I like what I’ve seen so far.

 

Furi: So Hard It’s Fun

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I spent all of this week trying to down the second boss in Furi, one of July’s PS Plus freebies. I don’t normally play games in the “so hard it’s fun” genre. I like some challenge in my games but I’m not a fan of the all challenge all the time style. But after playing Dark Souls 2  last weekend, I was in the mood to test my difficulty limits.

The story began with a pretty cut-scene. I escaped from my cell,and picked a fight with my captor, the Warden. The fight, which was basically the tutorial, went well. I lost some lives but overall I beat him on my first try.  Brimming with confidence, I started the long walk down to the next level and the new boss all while a man with a rabbit head filled me in on her. Upon arrival I was thoroughly trounced again and again by the Hunter.

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In this twin stick shooter/hack and slash game, each boss has 6 phases and each phase you are given full health and 3 lives. If you lose a life during a phase the phase starts over and the boss gets their health back. Lose all three lives and the whole thing starts from phase one again. Starting over and over had me yelling at my TV more than I’d care to admit. Everything you just did for the past 20 minutes didn’t count.

That’s what I thought at first. But as I came back to challenge the boss once or twice a day  I noticed I was getting better. Taking the approach of playing it a little each day instead of trying to power through it for hours definitely helped make it least frustrating.  I was dying less during the early phases, I started having more health on my last life on the later phases, my parries were getting better and I knew the attack animations and how to avoid them. I was getting better as a player. What surprised me was that even though I wasn’t going anywhere in the game, I felt like I was progressing.Finally on Friday I kicked the second boss into a pit with a cry of victory  and was on my way to the third. Maybe this one won’t take so long to beat.

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Exploring The Elder Scrolls Online

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I’ve been wanting to try out ESO for a while. For one, it’s on PS4 which means it’ll look pretty and two I’ve heard a lot of good things about it. I’ve been putting off actually buying it though. I rented it when it first came out and couldn’t get into it. The combat felt weak, the story was ok, and the character models looked kinda ugly. I returned it after a day and forgot about it. Lately it’s been creeping up in the news and I’ve met some people over PS4 that have had nothing but good things to say about it. Plus they just released a new DLC.

I found a copy of the game for $5 dollars at a local used store and fired it up. A friend of mine wanted to play together so we made some new characters and started our adventure. We ran around the starting city for a while racing through quest he had already done. I got acclimated to the combat and the skill system. It was nice to play with someone who was so knowledgeable in Elder Scrolls lore, as I have barely played more than 20 hours in Skyrim. I was having a bit more fun with it playing together. It really wasn’t until I sat down and played by myself for a couple hours to get my bearings that I started to click with the game.

My one dilemma so far is choosing a class. I’ve created 8 different characters trying out a lot of the different classes and skills. This is the one time I’m glad there aren’t a ton of classes to choose from, it’s hard enough with four. And then you have to decide between magika and stamina, and then what kind of weapon you want to use, and then what kind of armor there’s a lot of choice. Once I figure out the class I’ll have to figure out what race I want to play…so many decisions.Speaking of the character creator, I can’t remember the last time I was able to make a character with a beer gut.

The friend I’ve been playing with has his characters in the Ebonheart Pact faction and after restarting so many times, I’ve become very familiar with Bleakrock Isle. I really like the sturcture of the main quest there, gathering all the villagers in town before evacuating. And each villager only goes back to town after you complete their side quest. After the 8th time doing it all I’m so ready to move on.

After a lot of testing I’ve at least figured out the class I want to play formy first time around Tamerial, a magika nightblade. At first I was sure I wanted to be a bow and dual weilding stamina night blade but I liked the idea of a nightblade healer so much I just started over.I;m glad there are restats in this game if I ever want to try something different.

Even though I’m playing on PS4 there seems to be a ton of people in the starting zones even before Dark Brotherhood launched. I was actually surprised considering the game is about 1.5 years old on consoles now.One of my only complaint so far is that there is only voice chat, which I quickly opted out of while exploring. It wouldn’t be so bad if there weren’t people constantly blaring music, eating, or screaming for no apparent reason. Of course I’ll opt back in for group content but while I’m out in the world alone, silence is golden.

 

 

 

 

 

Taking Inventory

Hello, hi, and welcome to my very first post here at I’m Not Squishy! This blog will chronicle my adventures through my backlog and serve as a platform to write about my unyielding love for MMOs,RPGs, and video games of every flavor.

Now I know what your thinking, having a backlog of video games is probably the biggest first world problem right next to the Starbucks running out of whip cream. Why does it matter if these games go unfinished? Well the truth is it doesn’t, but it sounds like a whole lot of fun trying to beat as many as I can!

Meet the Backlog:

It’s always best to know what your up against when you start a project. I took the time to actually look through my Bin O’ Games and see just how many games I have left to complete. The break down looks something like this:

PlayStation 4: 9 unfinished games*

8 PS4 Games
*Digital Download: Tom Clancy’s The Division

 

PlayStation 3: 32 unfinished games*

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*Digital Downloads: Mass Effect 1, 2 and 3, Ni No Kuni Wrath of the White Witch

 

3DS/DS: 7 unfinished Games*

5 3DS games and a DS game
* Digital Download: Little Battlers Experience

 

Things didn’t seem so bad until I opened up my Steam Library. When I did….oh god, the horror!  I’ve only had steam for 2 years and only discovered Humble Bundle last year. This has resulted in a whopping 79 unfinished games, many of which I never even started up.  According to http://www.howlongtobeatsteam.com, it would take about a month of playing 24/7 to beat the main story in all of my games.

I’ve decided to tackle my Steam Library and my PS4 collection first because I can take pretty screenshots easily. (Full disclosure, my laptop is 4 years old and runs an Intel 4000 integrated graphics chip so the screen shots from steam may not be so pretty.) For Steam I’m going to start with the games that take the least time to beat and work my way up. For PS4, PS3, and 3DS I’m going to play whatever I’m in the mood for.

I’m going to consider the game beaten once the credits role and/or the last level is beaten, the main story is over, the goal is obtained at which point there names will be immortalized on the Games Beaten page.  Actually after sitting down and going through the collection I have found some games to add to the games beaten page.